The Finnish verb PITÄÄ is extremely common and so incredible versatile that even native speakers can get overwhelmed by the long list of different meanings it can have. Watch this video to learn a few different ways to use PITÄÄ.

The example sentences mentioned in the video:

 

pitää jostakin = to like something

  • Minä pidän sinusta. = I like you.
  • Minä pidän tästä elokuvasta. = I like this movie.
  • Minä pidän siitä. = I like it.

 

pitää = must, have to

  • Minun pitää olla kotona illalla. = I have to be home in the evening.
  • Pitääkö sinun lähteä nyt? = Do you have to go now?
A bunny looks at watch and says "Minun pitää lähteä", which means "I have to leave".
Minun pitää lähteä. = I have to leave.

 

pitää = to keep

  • Aiotko sinä pitää sen? = Are you going to keep it?
  • Minä pidän sen. = I’m keeping it.

 

pitää = to hold

  • Mä voin pitää sun laukkua. = I can hold your bag.
  • Voisitko pitää tätä hetken? = Could you hold this for a second?
  • You can also say to someone: Pidä mun kädestä kiinni. = Hold my hand.

 

pitää = to keep something somewhere or in a certain state

  • Me pidämme autoa etupihalla. = We keep the car in the front yard.
  • Pidä mielessä, että huomenna sataa vettä. = Bear in mind that it’s going to rain tomorrow.
  • Anna vauvalle lelu, se pitää hänet hyvällä tuulella. = Give the baby a toy, it’ll keep him in a good mood.

 

pitää jotakin = to wear something

  • Mä en tykkää pitää solmiota. = I don’t like wearing a tie.

 

pitää = to throw a party, to hold a meeting, to organize or hold something

  • Pidän juhlat ensi viikonloppuna. = I’m throwing a party next weekend.
  • Vaalit pidetään ensi keväänä. = The election will be held next spring.

 

pitää jotakin jonakin = to consider, to view something as something or to think of someone as something

  • Minä pidän sinua rehellisenä ihmisenä. = I consider you an honest person.
  • Hän pitää minua hölmönä. = He or she considers me a fool.
  • Suomen kieltä pidetään vaikeana kielenä. = The Finnish language is considered a difficult language.

 

pitää = to keep something somewhere or in a certain state

  • Me pidämme autoa etupihalla. = We keep the car in the front yard.
  • Pidä mielessä, että huomenna sataa vettä. = Bear in mind that it’s going to rain tomorrow.
  • Anna vauvalle lelu, se pitää hänet hyvällä tuulella. = Give the baby a toy, it’ll keep him in a good mood.

 

pitää jotakin = to wear something

  • Mä en tykkää pitää solmiota. = I don’t like wearing a tie.

 

pitää = to throw a party, to hold a meeting, to organize or hold something

  • Pidän juhlat ensi viikonloppuna. = I’m throwing a party next weekend.
  • Vaalit pidetään ensi keväänä. = The election will be held next spring.

 

pitää jotakin jonakin = to consider, to view something as something or to think of someone as something

  • Minä pidän sinua rehellisenä ihmisenä. = I consider you an honest person.
  • Hän pitää minua hölmönä. = He or she considers me a fool.
  • Suomen kieltä pidetään vaikeana kielenä. = The Finnish language is considered a difficult language.

Want to learn more?

This video is from my online course library inside the Finking Cap Club. The complete module for the verb PITÄÄ comes with exercises. That's only a small part of what you can learn there. Come check it out and start learning Finnish with me today!

2 Responses

  1. I read Finnish at a fairly advanced level, although my personal dictionary with some 17,000 entries keeps expanding. (There is no end to vocabulary.)

    I am a retired professor (linguistics with emphasis on historical Germanic languages particularly nordic languages. I am a native speaker of English, a near native speaker of German and Swedish, and can read the rest. Decades ago I decided to take on Finnish and have been pecking away at it since. I currently have a small group reading Tuntematon Sotilas for an hour a week (by Zoom).

    Your approach seems good, so I will probably give it a try.

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